FREE Shipping on ALL US ORDERS
800-624-1416

How to Introduce Solid Foods to Babies

by

In my medical practice I helped parents introduce solid foods. And as a parent to two kids myself, I’ve experienced this process first hand. Watching kids try foods for the first time can be fun, and funny. But it can also create anxiety for new parents. 

The following was a handout I shared with my patients to guide them through the process of introducing solid foods to their babies. Being the father of two children myself, this wasn’t just a theoretical exercise. Romi and I lived it too. 

I’m happy to provide you with this How To guide and I hope it helps; however, the individual nutritional needs of your child may require a different approach and it’s best to follow the advice of her healthcare provider. 

When starting on solid foods, it’s important to begin with foods that best supplement mother’s milk, that are high in iron and carbohydrates, and that are easy on the baby’s developing G.I. tract. It’s important to only introduce one food at a time. Begin with one and if the baby has had no bad reaction to it after 4-7 days, you can introduce another food.

If the baby shows any signs of allergy to the food such as sneezing, runny nose, rash around the anus or urethra, change in stool, or irritability, discontinue the food and wait until the symptoms are gone before trying any other new food. 

This method safeguards the baby’s immature gastrointestinal system by allowing her to process only one food at a time. Never introduce a new food if the baby is sick in any way. New foods should be avoided if the baby is suffering from diarrhea, cramps or colic, a skin or diaper rash. 

Common allergens should be avoided altogether for the first year. These include cow’s milk, wheat, citrus, eggs and chocolate.

More than anything, enjoy the process, because it only happens once. Some of our favorite memories and photos of our children are when they were tasting different foods for the first time. Or when they would be learning to feed themselves and most of the food seemed to end up all over their face, the high chair and the floor. I still laugh at it now, more than a decade later. 

6 Months 

Hypoallergenic pureed, mashed foods containing iron—1–2 Tbsp/day

ApricotBananaBlackberry
BroccoliCarrotsCauliflower
CherryGrapeJerusalem Artichoke
KiwiPeachPear
PruneSquashYam

 

6 Months 

Hypoallergenic pureed, mashed foods containing iron—1–2 Tbsp/day

ApricotBananaBlackberry
BroccoliCarrotsCauliflower
CherryGrapeJerusalem Artichoke
KiwiPeachPear
PruneSquashYam

 

9 Months 

Foods high in zinc and good for developing the immune system

ApplesBlack beansBlack strap molasses
AvocadoBlueberryCabbage
Lima beanMilletOatmeal
PapayaPotatoRice cereal
Split pea soupString beanSweet potato

 

9 Months 

Foods high in zinc and good for developing the immune system

ApplesBlack beansBlack strap molasses
AvocadoBlueberryCabbage
Lima beanMilletOatmeal
PapayaPotatoRice cereal
Split pea soupString beanSweet potato

 

12 Months 

Food high in zinc and bulk—4–10 Tbsp/day

Acorn squashAsparagusBarley
ChardLentilsParsnip
TofuYogurt

 

12 Months 

Food high in zinc and bulk—4–10 Tbsp/day

Acorn squashAsparagusBarley
ChardLentilsParsnip
TofuYogurt

 

18 Months 

Foods high in B vitamins and Calcium

BeetsBuckwheatChicken
EggplantFishGreens
KelpLambRutabaga
RyeTahini

 

18 Months 

Foods high in B vitamins and Calcium

BeetsBuckwheatChicken
EggplantFishGreens
KelpLambRutabaga
RyeTahini

 

21 Months 

Food high in protein

BeefCottage cheeseNut butter
Peanut butterSunflower seeds

 

21 Months 

Food high in protein

BeefCottage cheeseNut butter
Peanut butterSunflower seeds

 

How to Eat Healthy This Thanksgiving

How to Eat Healthy This Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. Romi and I always enjoy slowing down and spending time with our family and good friends, preparing and eating delicious meals. Most of all, we enjoy giving thanks. Not only does that make the holiday more enjoyable, but a Harvard...

Share This