Men's Health

Men's Health

Health concerns in men change with age. Early in adulthood the most common concerns are unintentional injury. But as men age they develop risks for heart disease, prostate cancer, osteoporosis, muscle wasting and dementia.
 
Diet, lifestyle and dietary supplements affect the risk for these conditions. Research suggests that eighty percent of prostate cancers are caused by poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and obesity.1,2 The most common cancer in men is prostate cancer, and it is the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States. A man’s risk increases with age: fifty percent risk at fifty years old, sixty percent at sixty years old, seventy percent at seventy years old, and so forth. The older one gets, however, the less aggressive the cancer is likely to be, and the less likely it is that a man will die from the prostate cancer versus some other cause.

Strokes are a leading cause of disability and death. Aging increases the risk for strokes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly ten percent of men sixty-five years or older have had a stroke.3 Eighty percent of strokes are caused by blood clots. Nattokinase with pine bark extract has been shown to promote healthy blood clotting.

Bone health is often overlooked in men. Five million men either have osteoporosis or are at risk for it. Men with osteoporosis who fracture a hip have a 30% chance of dying.4 Typically considered a woman’s disease, it’s now recognized that men need to be screened for osteoporosis and take a calcium supplement. In addition to calcium, men should consider an osteoporosis supplement that delivers 45 mg of MK4, a form of vitamin K2. Studies show that MK4, when combined with calcium and vitamin D, can decrease hip fractures by more than 70%.5